A dataset provided by the European Space Agency

Name S1-X-SPEDE-2-EDR-EE-EP-MONITORING
Mission SMALL-MISSIONS-FOR-ADVANCED-RESEARCH-AND-TECHNOLOGY
URL ftp://npsa01.esac.esa.int/pub/mirror/SMALL-MISSIONS-FOR-ADVANCED-RESEARCH-AND-TECHNOLOGY/SPEDE/S1-X-SPEDE-2-EDR-EE-EP-MONITORING-V1.0
DOI 10.5270/esa-2s7qgse
Abstract N/A
Description Data Set Overview = This data set contains level 1b processed data for the SPEDE instrument on SMART-1. The set covers the time period from start of SPEDE nominal operations on orbit 15 (4 October 2003) to the orbit 259 (1 April 2004). Activities during this period will be covered in more detail in later documents and reports of science analysis. For SPEDE instrument description see SPEDEPAPER in DOCUMENT directory. The main activity performed during the period was monitoring the plasma environment of SMART-1 during operation of the EP thruster. EP was operated most of the time in order to raise the SMART-1 orbit outside of the radiation belts. Thus very little data other than EP monitoring was collected. Especially during christmas period, EP was on almost two weeks continuously. On 18 and 19 March 2004, a special calibration in eclipse was performed (see S1-SPE-PL-3003 for the plan and S1-SPE-RP-3010 for analysis). The photoelectron current calibration reported in S1-SPE-RP-3008 was repeated on 6 April 2005. One instrument flight software updates were performed during this period: on 10 March 2004 to correct an unwanted hysteresis effect in sweep data. The unwanted feature in sweep data (plasma data in PDS vocabulary) was successfully removed with the first update. The operation of the instrument was controlled by nominal Instrument Operations Timeline (ITL) sequences, developed for EP monitoring. The activities in the ITL were coordinated with the EPDP instrument. During EP off SPEDE was either in housekeeping mode (mode 1, which is a mode with 1 sample / minute) or in some of specific natural plasma modes. SPEDE instrument configuration tables were mostly unchanged within this data set. Configuration table dumps as confirmation for successful update were generated. The r^ant parameters for each measurement are included in the header of each file. The level 1b data consist of measurements decoded f...
Instrument SPEDE
Temporal Coverage 2003-10-04T21:48:03Z/2004-04-01T09:50:44Z
Version V1.0
Mission Description Mission Overview SMART-1 is the first of the Small Missions for Advanced Research and Technology (SMART), which are elements of ESA's Horizons 2000 plan for scientific projects. A brief description of the mission and its objectives can be found in the SMART-1 Archive Plan [S1_ARCH_PLAN_2003], and in papers by [MARINI_ET_AL_2002] and [RACCA_ET_AL_2002]. A detailed description of the mission analysis can be found in the Consolidated Report on Mission Analysis [CREMA_2001]. The SMART missions aim at testing key technologies for future cornerstone missions. The primary technological objective of SMART-1 is the flight demonstration of Solar-Electric-Primary-Propulsion (SEPP) for a scientific lunar orbiting spacecraft delivered from launch into a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). The spacecraft was designed to operate with minimum ground intervention (e.g. one pass every 4 days). However, the use of ground stations throughout the mission was on availability basis with, on average, a pass once a day. SMART-1 was launched from Kourou at 23:14 UTC on 27th Sept 2003 as a co- passenger on an Ariane-5 launcher. The launch mass of the spacecraft was 367kg, including 82.5kg of Xenon propellant for the SEPP and 19kg instrument payload. After release into the geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) the spacecraft acquired initial attitude, autonomously deployed the solar arrays and entered a checkout phase. The GTO had the following parameters. A=24702.3km E=0.71578 Inc=6.999deg RAAN=250.965deg APER=178.246deg Perigee=7020.8km Apogee=42383.7km The first firing of the SEPP occurred at 12:20:21 UT on 30th September 2003. The escape from the Earth was performed by gradually expanding the orbit from the initial geostationary transfer orbit parameters. Continuous thrusting was required for a little over 80 days in order to pass the main radiation belts as quickly as possible, pushing the perigee out to 20,000km. After this ...
Creator Contact Dr. Anssi Malkki
Date Published 2006-06-21T00:00:00Z
Publisher And Registrant European Space Agency
Credit Guidelines European Space Agency, 2006-06-21T00:00:00Z, S1-X-SPEDE-2-EDR-EE-EP-MONITORING, V1.0. https://doi.org/10.5270/esa-2s7qgse