A dataset provided by the European Space Agency

Name 076470
Title What Makes Them Tick: Understanding the behaviour of Lanning 386 and J1923
URL

http://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0764700101
http://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0764700201
http://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0764700301
http://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0764700401
http://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0764700501

DOI 10.5270/esa-vy4c5d4
Author Mr Mark Kennedy
Description Lanning 386 and J1923 are new cataclysmic variables which do not fall into the normal categories. Both systems show two distinct states, a low state similar to a dwarf nova, and a high state simlar to a SW Sextantis star,with strong He II and the rarely seen C IV emission lines. Observations of J1923 lead us to believe that the accretion disk may be truncated before hitting the surface to the white dwarf due to the presence of a strong magnetic field, similar to the intermediate polars. We propose observing both of these systems over several epochs to determine whether the x-ray spectrum of these objects are hard or soft, which will tell us whether these sytems are closer to SW Sextantis stars or intermediate polars while in the high state.
Publication XMM-Newton observations of the peculiar cataclysmic variable Lanning 386: X-ray evidence for a magnetic primary . Kennedy, M. R., Callanan, P., et all. . MNRAS . 466-2202 . 2017 . 2017MNRAS.466.2202K ,
Instrument EMOS1, EMOS2, EPN, OM, RGS1, RGS2
Temporal Coverage 2015-04-12T10:49:53Z/2015-05-21T19:22:04Z
Version 17.56_20190403_1200
Mission Description The European Space Agency's (ESA) X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) was launched by an Ariane 504 on December 10th 1999. XMM-Newton is ESA's second cornerstone of the Horizon 2000 Science Programme. It carries 3 high throughput X-ray telescopes with an unprecedented effective area, and an optical monitor, the first flown on a X-ray observatory. The large collecting area and ability to make long uninterrupted exposures provide highly sensitive observations.
Since Earth's atmosphere blocks out all X-rays, only a telescope in space can detect and study celestial X-ray sources. The XMM-Newton mission is helping scientists to solve a number of cosmic mysteries, ranging from the enigmatic black holes to the origins of the Universe itself. Observing time on XMM-Newton is being made available to the scientific community, applying for observational periods on a competitive basis.
Creator Contact https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/xmm-newton/xmm-newton-helpdesk
Date Published 2016-06-09T22:00:00Z
Publisher And Registrant European Space Agency
Credit Guidelines European Space Agency, 2016-06-09T22:00:00Z, 076470, 17.56_20190403_1200. https://doi.org/10.5270/esa-vy4c5d4