A dataset provided by the European Space Agency

Name 072415
Title Do GRBs occur in galaxies with AGN?
URL

http://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0724150101
http://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0724150201
http://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0724150301

DOI 10.5270/esa-5z64qdi
Author Dr Myrto Symeonidis
Description Currently, long duration GRBs (LGRBs) are thought to be triggered by the collapse of a massive low metallicity star, establishing them as powerful probes of massive star-formation in young galaxies out to the early epochs of galaxy formation. However, to date, the properties of their host galaxies at high redshift are not well understood. In particular, although we know of LGRB host galaxies in the ULIRG regime, we do not yet know whether LGRB hosts are ever home to AGN and whether the AGN, if present, has evolved sufficiently to be an active participant in the evolution of the system. Determining the stage of black hole growth in LGRB hosts would thus bring us closer to understanding the stages of galaxy evolution for which the star formation history can be probed using GRBs.
Publication The Million Optical - Radio-X-ray Associations (MORX) Catalogue . Flesch, Eric W., . PASA . 33-52 . 2016 . 2016PASA...33...52F ,
Dust scattering X-ray expanding rings around gamma-ray bursts . Mereghetti, S., Tiengo, A., . NCimB . 121-1111 . 2006 . 2006NCimB.121.1111M ,
Instrument EMOS1, EMOS2, EPN, OM, RGS1, RGS2
Temporal Coverage 2013-07-25T02:45:40Z/2013-12-24T03:19:05Z
Version 17.56_20190403_1200
Mission Description The European Space Agency's (ESA) X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) was launched by an Ariane 504 on December 10th 1999. XMM-Newton is ESA's second cornerstone of the Horizon 2000 Science Programme. It carries 3 high throughput X-ray telescopes with an unprecedented effective area, and an optical monitor, the first flown on a X-ray observatory. The large collecting area and ability to make long uninterrupted exposures provide highly sensitive observations.
Since Earth's atmosphere blocks out all X-rays, only a telescope in space can detect and study celestial X-ray sources. The XMM-Newton mission is helping scientists to solve a number of cosmic mysteries, ranging from the enigmatic black holes to the origins of the Universe itself. Observing time on XMM-Newton is being made available to the scientific community, applying for observational periods on a competitive basis.
Creator Contact https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/xmm-newton/xmm-newton-helpdesk
Date Published 2015-01-20T23:00:00Z
Publisher And Registrant European Space Agency
Credit Guidelines European Space Agency, 2015-01-20T23:00:00Z, 072415, 17.56_20190403_1200. https://doi.org/10.5270/esa-5z64qdi